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International Babywearing Week 2017

Written by Vanessa on September 28th, 2017.      0 comments

It's almost International Babywearing Week & here in New Zealand, it kicks off on 30 September - 8 October 2017.

There are many official babywearing events scheduled all around the country so check out your local community babywearing Facebook page for dates & times of events near you.

The theme for this year's International Babywearing Week’s celebration is Threaded Together. The inspiration for the theme comes from the many different threads that when combined through the weaving process form all of the carriers we use. All of these individual threads, once woven, create a material in the same way individuals and groups worldwide come together to create a global babywearing community.
We love, love, love this!

If you are new to the world of babywearing & wondering what this week is all about, well, it is about celebrating babywearing in New Zealand & around the world.
It is about spreading the word about babywearing and its many benefits for children and their caregivers and to share information about babywearing.

If you need convincing about getting started with babywearing, below are just some of the benefits:

Benefits of Babywearing


Medical professionals agree that infants thrive through touch; “wearing” your baby is another way to meet this need. The benefits of babywearing don’t end there … babywearing offers many other advantages, some of which include:

Happy Babies. It’s true … carried babies cry less! In a study published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers found that babywearing for three hours a day reduced infant crying by 43 percent overall and 54 percent during evening hours. (1)
Healthy Babies. Premature babies and babies with special needs often enter the world with fragile nervous systems. When a baby rides in a sling attached to his mother, he is in tune with the rhythm of her breathing, the sound of her heartbeat, and the movements his mother makes—walking, bending, and reaching. This stimulation helps him to regulate his own physical responses. Research has even shown that premature babies who are touched and held gain weight faster and are healthier than babies who are not. (2)

Confident Parents. A large part of feeling confident as a parent is the ability to read our babies’ cues successfully. Holding our babies close in a sling allows us to become finely attuned to their movements, gestures, and facial expressions. Every time a baby is able to let us know that she is hungry, bored, or wet without having to cry, her trust in us is increased, her learning is enhanced, and our own confidence is reinforced. This cycle of positive interaction deepens the mutual attachment between parent and child, and is especially beneficial for mothers who are at risk for or suffering from postpartum depression. (3) (4)

Loving Caregivers. Baby carriers are a great bonding tool for fathers, grandparents, adoptive parents, babysitters, and other caregivers. Imagine a new father going for a walk with his baby in a sling. The baby isbecoming used to his voice, heartbeat, movements, and facial expressions, and the two are forging a strong attachment of their own. Baby carriers are beneficial for every adult in a baby’s life. Cuddling up close in the sling is a wonderful way to get to know the baby in your life, and for the baby to get to know you!

Comfort and Convenience. With the help of a good carrier, you can take care of older children or do chores without frequent interruptions from an anxious or distressed infant—which helps to reduce sibling rivalry. Baby carriers are also wonderful to use with older babies and toddlers; you can save those arms and go where strollers can’t. Climbing stairs, hiking, and navigating crowded airports all can be done with ease when you use a well-designed baby carrier!

References
1 – Hunziker UA, Garr RG. (1986) Increased carrying reduces infant crying: A random-ized controlled trial. Pediatrics 77:641-648
2 – “Current knowledge about skin-to-skin (kangaroo) care for pre-term infants”. J Perinatol. 1991 Sep;11(3):216-26.
3 – Pelaez-Nogueras M, Field TM, Hossain Z, Pickens J. (1996). Depressed mothers’ touching increases infants’ positive affect and attention in still-face interactions. Child Development, 67, 1780-92.
4 – Tessier R, M Cristo, S Velez, M Giron, JG Ruiz-Palaez, Y Charpak and N Charpak. (1998) Kangaroo mother care and the bonding hypothesis. Pediatrics 102:e17.

2017-BENEFITS-OF-BABYWEARING-2-Increased Bonding 01-980

 
 

Ergobaby - How to Get Your Baby Out of a Back Carry Position Safely

Written by Vanessa on March 9th, 2017.      0 comments

It's super important to keep baby and yourself safe & injury free when babywearing and getting bubs in & out of a back carry position can be a little tough to get right.

Below is a video on how to safely get a baby out of a back carry with a back carry dismount in an Ergobaby Carrier.
 
 

Keep Cool Over Summer Whilst Babywearing

Written by Vanessa on February 8th, 2017.      0 comments

Top tips for keeping cool in the hotter months when babywearing.
 

Babywearing Safety

Written by Lou on November 21st, 2013.      0 comments

5 Points to Babywearing Safety


Babywearing is AWESOME and some of this is just common-sense but to remove all doubt, here's an updated safety guide to Babywearing.
 

C-A-R-R-Y:


CAREFUL. If you wouldn’t do an activity whilst pregnant, don’t do it while wearing your baby. Like being pregnant, babywearing can tilt your centre of gravity and not allow you to see your feet much. Avoid climbing ladders, horse riding, parasailing, and any other risky sport that could lead to a fall. Unlike being inside your womb where the baby is protected, the carried baby does not have protection surrounding them. Be mindful of what your baby can reach. Babywearing in the kitchen? Watch the hot pot on the stove or the kitchen knife when you turn to grab something else.

AIRFLOW. You should always be able to easily see your baby’s face without opening the fabric. Ensure that your baby’s chin is not pressed against his/her chest to compress airways and lead to ‘positional asphyxia’. To check, simply slip two fingers under baby’s chin to ensure easy breathing. Airway blockages can occur in any device, including some prams and car seats that allow the head to flop forward, so be vigilant.

RIDE HIGH. Keep the baby high and tight against your chest, not low on your hips. This will afford you a good line of sight to monitor your baby’s wellbeing. A sling or carrier should mimic holding baby in your arms, or in a back carry, like a piggy back. You would find it tiring carrying baby in your arms lower than your belly button, likewise a sling that carries your baby low will quickly strain your shoulders and back.

RIGHT FIT. Make sure that you read your sling/ carrier’s instruction booklet and watch the videos if available, so you can ensure the carrier is the right fit for your body shape and the age/weight of your baby. When trying a new carry position, test it with a doll or teddy the first few times, with your partner to spot check you. Back carry positions are recommended to learn while kneeling in the middle of your bed.

YOUR INSTINCT – you are the parent, trust your instinct. Your carrier/sling should mimic the way you would naturally hold your baby in your arms. You should always be able to make eye contact with your baby. This will allow you to determine whether baby is safe, happy and content. A quick glance will allow you to assess if their chin is up and that they are comfortable. Using the back carry position? Invest in a Rear View Mirror for peace of mind.
Topics: Babywearing, safety
 

Blokes wearing babies AKA Babywearing Dads

Written by Lou on August 16th, 2013.      0 comments

BellyBeyond BannerV12

 

The ultimate baby carrier + nappy bag prize pack for Dad (that's perfect for Mum too!)

Enter the draw to win the Belly Beyond Father's Day Giveaway!  Up for grabs is:

  • An Ergobaby X-Tra Carrier worth $229:  With extra length in all the right places, the new Ergobaby X-tra Carrier is a perfect fit for taller and broader dads.
  • A Diaper Dude Messenger Nappy Bag worth $129:  A nappy bag that Dad won't shy away from, it's designed to hold everything you need to access without having to take the bag off - brilliant!

ENTER HERE VIA OUR FACEBOOK PAGE

 
 
We are finding a real trend in Dad getting involved in babywearing, including researching carriers and the new Ergobaby X-tra Carrier, with extra extension length, will definitely appeal to the lads. It's got a longer strap length capacity so it's ideal for larger people and its front, hip or back carry makes it a good choice of carrier from newborn right up to 3+.

Here's Mr Belly Beyond (left) getting in on the Babywearing fun and check out these celebrity babywearing Dads rocking their Ergobaby Carriers.
 
Ergo swing ErgoCelebOrlandoKiss
Mr Belly Beyond (eg, not a celebrity) ;) Orlando Bloom
ErgoCelebCareyBlackErgo ErgoCelebStephenMoyerAnnaPaquin
Carey Hart Stephen Moyer
 
 

What we love about Slings

Written by Lou on October 8th, 2012.      0 comments

PampasSling150dulcetwins

What we love about Slings - Newborn


* Baby slings are a fantastic way to carry your baby right from when newborn. When babies are so tiny they love the closeness and warmth of mumma's body right there and it's very settling for them. For particularly fussy times (around about 5.10pm in our house!) put baby in the sling and get on with what you were doing. The rhythm of your movement as you go about your business will lull them and soothe them and my babies often drifted off asleep very easily this way.

* The dulce&zoet, Peanut Shell or Natures Sway sling are ideal for putting baby in when you need to pick up older children from kindy, daycare or playgroup.

* You won't have little old ladies fussing in babies face and waking them up! Your little one is tucked safely away and unless they spot the feet out one side a lot of people don't even notice you're carrying a baby.

* You can easily breastfeed in the sling and it offers privacy as well.


What we love about Slings - Older Baby

* Fantastic for quick trips to the shops or the bank when you don't want the hassle of getting out the pram. Brilliant if you have older children too because you can put baby in the sling and know you'll have your hands free to manage a breakaway toddler if need be.


What we love about Slings - Toddler

* Pick me up Mummy! Mummy I'm tiiired. Carry me Mummy!! Yes, been there. Pull your sling out of your handbag and give their tired little legs a break.

Want it?

Our top picks

  • dulce&zoet Sling $74 - no straps or buckles just a shaped pouch sized just for you and your little one, made right here in NZ.   The perfect handbag item to pull out when you need it. 
  • Peanut Shell Sling $99 - fully adjustible so any size person can wear the same sling (eg, Mum or Dad or Grandparents)

Worth a look

Topics: Babywearing, slings
 
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